Christine L. Gardiner, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice

Christine (Christie) L. Gardiner, Ph. D

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dr. Christine Gardiner is a Professor of Criminal Justice. Her fields of expertise include policing, crime policy, and juvenile delinquency. She was awarded a prestigious National Institute of Justice grant to study the effects of Proposition 36 (drug treatment in-lieu-of-incarceration law) on the case processing and sentencing of drug offenders and criminal justice practitioners in Orange County, California and helped create a "Blueprint for juvenile offender reentry" for Orange County. She also helped develop a set of recommendations to improve inter-agency collaboration between LA County’s public safety agencies and studied public opinion on the legalization of marijuana in California. Additionally, she conducted two major studies on the role of higher education in policing – one on California specifically, the other National. She has authored numerous articles, book chapters, and an introduction to policing textbook and has edited books on criminal justice policy and the California criminal justice system. Prior to becoming an academic, she worked as a crime analyst, police dispatcher, intern probation officer, and police explorer.

Department: Criminal Justice

Phone: (657) 278 - 3608

Email:  cgardiner@fullerton.edu

Office: UH 530

Office Hours: View Here Opens in new window

CURRICULUM VITAE PDF File

 

Degrees

  • 2008, Ph.D, University of California, Irvine
  • 1995, M.Phil., Cambridge University (England)
  • 1988, B.A, University of California, Irvine

 

Research Areas

  • Juvenile Delinquency
  • Criminal justice system capacity
  • Theories of crime
  • Crime prevention
  • Research methods

 

Courses Regularly Taught

  • CRJU315 - The Law Enforcement Function
  • CRJU405 - Criminal Justice Policy
  • CRJU425 - Juvenile Justice
  • CRJU475T - Policing the City (award-winning service learning course)
  • CRJU475T - Applied Policy Research (new course for Spring 2014)
  • POSC493 - Teaching Internship

PUBLICATIONS


 

Dissertation:  

Gardiner, Christine L. (2008).  From Inception to Implementation: How the Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act has affected the case processing and sentencing of drug offenders in one California county.       

click here to view complete dissertation PDF File PDF File

 

Book Reviews:

Gardiner, Christine L. (2008). Review of the book “Gates of Injustice: The Crisis in America’s Prisons.” Punishment and Society, 10 (3).

Gardiner, Christine L. (2007). Review of the book “Saving Children from a Life of Crime: Early Risk Factors and Effective Interventions.” British Journal of Criminology, 47 (6).

Christine L.

Gardiner, Ph.D.


Associate Professor of Criminal Justice
I received my PhD in Criminology, Law and Society from University of California, Irvine in 2008.  My fields of expertise include Proposition 36, crime policy, criminal justice system constraints, juvenile delinquency, policing, and research methods.  My doctoral research, which was funded by a National Institute of Justice Dissertation Fellowship, focused on the impact of California’s Proposition 36 on the case processing and sentencing of drug offenders in Orange County. Proposition 36, also known the Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act of 2000, prescribed drug treatment in lieu of incarceration for non-violent drug offenders.
I received my BAs in Social Ecology and Economics from University of California, Irvine in 1993. During my undergraduate studies I spent a year studying at Lancaster University in Northwest England (fun fact:  Professor Mallicoat also studied at Lancaster University when she was an undergraduate—no, we were not there at the same time – although that would have been pretty cool).  This experience led me to pursue my M.Phil. in Criminology at Cambridge University (England), which I earned in 1995.  My master’s thesis examined Santa Ana Police Department’s Community Oriented Policing Philosophy. If you are interested in learning more about the M.Phil at Cambridge, I encourage you to come talk me.
In my prior (pre-professor) life, I was a police explorer for Foster City Police Department (in the San Francisco Bay Area), a dispatcher for Irvine Police Department, a crime analyst for Riverside Sheriff’s Department, and an intern-probation officer for Los Angeles County Probation Department. Beyond these "criminal justice" jobs, I was also an E.M.T. (I worked on an ambulance for a few weeks before I realized I wasn’t cut out for the job and instead taught CPR and first aid for awhile), a van driver for seniors and disabled citizens, and a junior high school camp counselor (it was the best job ever because I got paid to go to really fun places).When I am not teaching or researching, I love spending time with my family, which includes two daughters (ages 14 and 18), a yellow lab dog (who thinks he is kid #3), and a husband.  I am actively involved in my church and community and I volunteer whenever I can (especially with the Girl Scouts).   I hope to get back to scrap booking and playing soccer soon.  
  • 2008, Ph.D, University of California, Irvine

  • 1995, M.Phil., Cambridge University (England)

  • 1988, B.A, University of California, Irvine

CURRICULUM VITAE PDF File

  • Juvenile Delinquency

  • Criminal justice system capacity

  • Theories of crime

  • Crime prevention

  • Research methods

  • CRJU315 - The Law Enforcement Function

  • CRJU405 - Criminal Justice Policy

  • CRJU425 - Juvenile Justice

  • CRJU475T - Policing the City (award-winning service learning course)

  • CRJU475T - Applied Policy Research (new course for Spring 2014)

  • POSC493 - Teaching Internship

Dissertation:  

Gardiner, Christine L. (2008).  From Inception to Implementation: How the Substance Abuse and Crime Prevention Act has affected the case processing and sentencing of drug offenders in one California county.       

click here to view complete dissertation PDF File

 

Book Reviews:

Gardiner, Christine L. (2008). Review of the book “Gates of Injustice: The Crisis in America’s Prisons.” Punishment and Society, 10 (3).

Gardiner, Christine L. (2007). Review of the book “Saving Children from a Life of Crime: Early Risk Factors and Effective Interventions.” British Journal of Criminology, 47 (6).

Links to Useful Websites and MORE...

Special Topic: Juvenile Delinquency*

Helpful for CRJU425 group projects)

Juvenile Offenders and Victims 2006 National Report: http://www.ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/ojstatbb/nr2006/index.html

* NIJ Report on Mentoring: link PDF File

NIJ Report on Co-Offending and Patterns of Juvenile Crime: http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/210360.pdf PDF File

* Costs-Benefits of Reduced Class Size and Full-day Kindergarten: http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/rptfiles/07-03-2201.pdf PDF File

* Evidence-based Public Policy Options (see exhibit 4 on page 9): http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/rptfiles/06-10-1201.pdf PDF File

* Dropout Nation (Cover story in Time Magazine – 4/9/06): http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1181646,00.html

* Escaping from Dropout Nation (Update in Time Magazine – 1/25/07): http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1582203,00.html

* The Vanishing Class (LA Times story – 1/29/06):http://www.latimes.com/news/education/la-me-dropout29jan29,0,6750397.story?coll=la-news-learning

 

Crime Statistics

NVCS (National Crime Victimization Survey): http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/

UCR (Uniform Crime Report): http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/ucr.htm

US Crime Stats (United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics): http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/welcome.html Opens in new window

California Crime Stats (California DOJ, BJS): http://caag.state.ca.us/cjsc/ Opens in new window

California Department of Corrections: http://www.corr.ca.gov/index.html

National Criminal Justice Reference Service: http://www.ncjrs.gov/App/QA/SearchQA.aspx  (answers many of the most frequently asked questions about crime and justice)

Sourcebook of Criminal Justice Statistics: http://www.albany.edu/sourcebook/

 

Law and the U.S. Adult Court System

CA Law (Penal Code and other laws): http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/calaw.html Opens in new window

*** The ‘Lectric Law Library's "Brief guide to the criminal justice system" (very good site!) http://www.lectlaw.com/files/crs02.htm

Many of the counties (including Orange County) have the same boilerplate "orientation to the criminal justice system" on their DA web pages.  Here is a sample from Santa Cruz County http://sccounty01.co.santa-cruz.ca.us/DAInternet/Orientation.asp

 

Law Enforcement Sites

Orange County Law Enforcement Agencies: http://www.ci.santa-ana.ca.us/pd/links.asp

 

Criminology, Law and Society Professional Organizations

American Society of Criminologists: http://www.asc41.com/ Opens in new window

Law and Society Association: http://www.lawandsociety.com/ Opens in new window

Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences: http://www.acjs.org/ Opens in new window

 

Criminal Justice News

Criminal Justice Journalist’s News Center: http://cjj.mn-8.net/login.asp?loc=&link Opens in new window =

 

Policy Related Sites

Criminal Justice Policy Almanac: http://www.policyalmanac.org/crime/index.shtml#Related_Sites Opens in new window

The Sentencing Project: http://www.sentencingproject.org/ Opens in new window

International Centre for Prison Studies: http://www.prisonstudies.org/ Opens in new window

Human Rights Watch: http://www.hrw.org/ Opens in new window

Office for National Drug Control Policy: http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/ Opens in new window

Campaign for New Drug Policies: http://www.drugreform.org/ Opens in new window

Drug Policy Alliance: http://www.drugpolicyalliance.org/homepage.cfm Opens in new window

Official Proposition 36 website: http://www.prop36.org/ Opens in new window

 

Writing and Referencing

APA Style Help: http://www.apastyle.org/previoustips.html Opens in new window

Purdue University Writing Lab: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/print/ Opens in new window

 

Learning Styles Inventory  http://www.vark-learn.com/english/index.asp

Take the VARK Questionnaire to see whether you are a Visual, Auditory, Kinesthetic or Read/Write type learner.  Knowing what type of learner you are will help you be a better student and make more efficient and effective use of your time!  Just remember- these are preferences only and you may use different strategies to learn in different types of classes.  Have Fun!